the tl;dr by canvas lms

Putting the Power in the Teacher's Hands

May 20, 2020 Canvas Product Team Episode 6
the tl;dr by canvas lms
Putting the Power in the Teacher's Hands
Chapters
0:25
Introduction
1:04
MasteryConnect and Item Authoring—Ben Berte
17:36
Teacher Appreciation Month & Educator of the Year Award Submissions—Brighton Hertford
24:45
InstructureCon Updates—Jackie Burrell
34:51
Wrapup
the tl;dr by canvas lms
Putting the Power in the Teacher's Hands
May 20, 2020 Episode 6
Canvas Product Team

A review of what's coming up for MasteryConnect and item authoring, a celebration of teachers and a call for Educator of the Year award submissions, and updates about InstructureCon's online transition.

Products

MasteryConnect Website

Events

CanvasCon Website (Virtual InstructureCon)

Teacher of the Year Awards 2020 (Blog Post)

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

A review of what's coming up for MasteryConnect and item authoring, a celebration of teachers and a call for Educator of the Year award submissions, and updates about InstructureCon's online transition.

Products

MasteryConnect Website

Events

CanvasCon Website (Virtual InstructureCon)

Teacher of the Year Awards 2020 (Blog Post)

Matt Goodwin:

It's that time again for the Canvas TLDR podcast. I'm Matt Goodwin with product.

Jenn Mitchell:

I'm Jenn Mitchell with K-12 product marketing.

Ryan Lufkin:

I'm Ryan Lufkin with higher ed product marketing.

Jenn Mitchell:

We're here to share the latest and greatest in Canvas.

Ryan Lufkin:

We're talking about the why in what we build, because pandas can't.

Matt Goodwin:

Welcome to episode six of the Canvas TLDR podcast. We've got some exciting things happening in the world of K-12 and some announcements , um, with some events. So Jenn, tell us what we're talking about in K-12 this week.

Jenn Mitchell:

Yeah, I'm excited. We're having Ben Berte, product director for MasteryConnect. He's going to come in and talk to us about all the great things that are happening in K-12 assessment.

Ryan Lufkin:

And, I think at this point, most of you have heard that there's some exciting news around InstructureCon, now Canvascon Online 2020. So we're going to talk to Jackie Burrell, who is our head of events at Instructure, and she's going to tell us a little bit more.

Matt Goodwin:

All right , let's get to it.

Jenn Mitchell:

You know , I'm excited to throw out something for our K-12 fans out there. Um, for those of you who don't know about MasteryConnect, MasteryConnect joined the Canvas family as a full-fledged assessment management system. Uh , the great thing about MasteryConnect is it, it helps you do four things more easily: effective formative assessment in your classroom, interim benchmark assessment at the district level , um, and it really fuels teacher collaboration, and allows teacher to self evaluate their own instructions so that they can tailor learning experiences and really make it personal for students. So I'm excited to join Ben. Um, he is our product—or is the product manager for mastery connect. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself? Ben? Thanks for joining us.

Ben Berte:

Yeah, thanks for having me. Good to be here. Um , so may I , as Jenn mentioned, my name is Ben. I'm the director of product to MasteryConnect. I'm a former educator but I guess we're always educators. So , um, I come from the classroom as well as academia doing different things around technology and assessment for K12 specifically. I started by founding Socrative, which is very bleeding edge formative assessment. And for the last six years I've been working with MasteryConnect and now I'm happy to be a part of Instructure and bring assessment to even a larger audience. So thanks for having me.

Jenn Mitchell:

Thanks for joining us. So what do we want to talk about? Some exciting things that are happening in the MasteryConnect system and you've told me some really cool things about some item authoring capabilities that are coming up. Can you, can you talk to me about that a little bit?

Ben Berte:

Yeah, for sure. I, you know, and it's wonderful to be here to get to share these features because we get building these things and they take a long time and then when you get to share them out and have people recognize what's coming , uh , it makes it feel fresh again. So I appreciate that. Um, for the last couple years we've really been pushing hard on our item bank and our item-based assessment world. We started as a document-based assessment company in 2010 with all of our being for document-based assessments , scannable and standards aligned. But as the market's really shifted in the last years to more item-based assessment, we've been making more robust functionality around technology enhanced items. So in the last couple of years we've added a number of item banks for purchase as well as the capability of authoring content within our system. So we started first with allowing districts to author content at the admin level. So you would have collaborative teams offering content that could then be reserved by the district or given out to the teachers in the form of an item bank. And this content was generally the basic question types. You had multiple choice, multi-select, you had true false—a lot of the paper based stuff was initially what you saw in the item based world. But what we've all started to see is that there are many, many more item types out there. So for last school year we rolled out 60 item types. This allows us to support many more subjects and many more teaching styles. So whether you're a social studies teacher or a high school math teacher, we want you to be able to add images and allow drawing in an item, or allow you to have a complex math editor that allows you to more accurately assess your students. So in the last years we've built these item banks and we've brought in these assessments. This year for back to school, we're very focused on student tools. So what can students use in order to show what they know and accurately be assessed on an assessment? So for back to school this year, we're working through a very long list of, of uh, accommodations as they're called and accessibility tools. Um, some of the highlights I've mentioned would be highlight—look at that timing—um , highlight, strike through , uh , ability to flag questions for review . So when a student is taking an assessment, they can flag a question. Note that that's a question to go back to. I think all of us at this, in this group, probably remember we used to just circle the number on our paper and that was our little signal, or put a star. Um , but it's gotten much more complex. You can just click on a question and put a flag and that lets the student know I should revisit this when I'm ready. Also adding accessibility tools so you can manipulate the font size of an assessment, change the colors, change the contrast...really making the assessment a better display of student understanding. And so just adding more of these robust tools. For district users, they recognize that a lot of these tools are what they see on higher stakes and state level tests . And so we also wanted to make sure that students are learning the tools that they might encounter on the state tests and so that they're gaining a familiarity with how do I strike through a question, how do I jot down notes down on a, on a, you know, a little tab that shows up on my screen, not just on my scratch paper. So it's, it's, it's an exciting opportunity next year for students to become more fluid with taking the test and using these tools to just be more comfortable that they're accurately displaying understanding.

Matt Goodwin:

Ben, you mentioned a few things that caught my attention, and it might be a little bit of a tangent here, but um, you know, you mentioned complexity. The complexity is ever increasing as we introduce technology and accommodations , um , for people that, that need that, you know, whether it be contrast or font size or um, you know, just the ability to take notes or strike through. Does that introduction of complexity detract from the assessment experience or enhance it? Like what are, what are the feedback , um, kind of quotes or , or highlights that we're getting from customers that let us know we're on the right path?

Ben Berte:

That's a really good question because complexity for complexity's sake is not going to help us understand what our students know and don't know. So we want to be able to roll out technology and add these enhancements in a way that are actually understandable and usable by the students. So a lot of what we've been hearing over the last years is, you know, first we need to have these items because students need to have the fluidity to work on a computer and navigate an assessment that has a drag and drop, questions that we used to maybe just draw arr—you know, draw lines across to do matching type activities. So assuming that they can answer a question that's a more complex technology enhanced item right off the bat is naive. We have to allow the students to also learn how to take the assessment with these item types. But it's important that we have these complex item types because they do allow us to not just have traditional multiple choice to actually have a better display of student understanding. So what we've been hearing from from the market is yes, we like the approach you're doing, where you're rolling it out in a cadence that allows us to become familiar with the content on both the teacher, the administrator, and the student side and roll out the tools as we learn. I mean, it's very much the kind of a Vygotsky principle of the zone of proximal development. If you push a tool too far past a student, they're going to shut down. Or any of us as learners, you want to have a tool that extends beyond where my understanding is now. So it's graph—it's graspable, something I can achieve without shutting me down. So we're very conscious of that with our users and doing onsite meetings and talking to customers, talking to students—where are you in your understanding and how can we make these tools usable but not mandatory. So I think it's always important that these things come to teachers with the option to use them and use them as they're learning individually. Because our teachers are learners, too. They're learning how to author a question that's not just multiple choice. How do I make a drag and drop that's of high quality? So all of the complexity is kind of that crawl, walk, run. Um, and I think we're hitting a good spot with that right now. The reality though is state assessments are already providing some of these types to students. So they're seeing them and we want to make sure that they're seeing them in a safe classroom style environment, formatively assessing as well as doing district benchmarks so that they get that comfort more than once a year when, you know, the stakes of that complexity could deter a student from displaying understanding, which is always the goal of assessment is: what do my students know and don't know. And that's really the goal and what do I do once I learn that as a student, as a parent, as a teacher, as an admin. It's a lot of words there but I think it's important that we kind of focus on that cadence of rolling out tools in a thoughtful way , um , across these. And it's important that it's for forethought, where a teacher's in control—it's not coming from just administrators, it's coming from all the stakeholders in student education.

Ryan Lufkin:

That's an actually—a really interesting point that, that idea of student—of teacher control. 'Cause I do think we, we see a lot of teachers talking about this, you know , increase use of technology and feeling a little bit of out of control. And, and you know, feel a little bit of lack of ownership being told they have to do certain things. And I think one of the things we really strive with Canvas is to put that power in the teacher's hands and make sure that they feel ownership and usability. And so it's great to hear you say that 'cause I think, I think that's a major—as we get through this together, that's a major focus for us as a company.

Ben Berte:

Right? Yeah. I mean the tools that have been in classrooms are fascinating. When we think back to overhead projectors coming into the classroom and having to have that flexibility—I'm not just writing things on the board, but I'm writing onto a screen that projects up where I can look at my students and still deliver a lecture. And as technology continues to, to roll out, you have to be very careful that you work with the whole system of teachers, ones that have been in the, you know—just out of school where they might've learned it in their program or those that have been in the field for many years and are experts in education. But these tools are coming along and we have to think about all of those users=, a really wide range of users. It kind of reminds me of, you know, we've been doing Zoom calls like a lot of us with, with my mom every weekend and my niece and my nephew and who's sending out the Zoom password and my mom's just happy to get her camera on and she's very savvy and great, but it's like, how are we making it easy for everyone to approach these situations we're all in.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah.

Jenn Mitchell:

And as we talk about everyone I know, as a teacher, if I was let's say a high school math teacher or some of these people that maybe the traditional item offering tools didn't work for them, can you tell us some exciting things, MasteryConnect, that they'll find?

Ben Berte:

Yes , definitely. And I think that it's complicated when you get into the, to the secondary level and you, you get to the sciences and the mathematics, you know, these tools are super important. So , um, of the 60 main item types we have, we have a number of , um, tools that allow them to add in math type, add in science, add in equations and things like that when authoring these items. We also have an integration with the Desmos calculator. Now Desmos has a series of graphing calculators that are especially useful in high school mathematics along with that come 20 item types that allow you to build questions that are parabola and more complex math items. So finally, instead of having to have it on and the grid and have the students draw, you can actually take these more complex items online as well. And have them be auto-graded. Now we know it'll take time for teachers to learn. So we have a number of videos and different trainings out there to help them. And a big piece of, you know, that collaboration at that secondary level is their professional learning community. So these tools are there and hopefully they'll be working together as colleagues to learn how to use the parabola function, for example, or something, or binomials or something more complex. So I think those should be a lot of excitement around the possibility of all of the content that are now accessible to the teachers and especially the STEM area. Um, which, you know, we're providing numerous, numerous tools that way. And all of this is accessible to the teacher on the mobile app as well. They can review all their assessments on their phone, on their iPad, and look at the content of that technology enhanced items, how students did on them . We want to make it also flexible and on the go and not just, I'm anchored to my desk and my computer, so how can I evolve with this technology and use the freedom of it at the same time walk around the classroom, things such as that.

Jenn Mitchell:

Ryan, I think that means you can throw away that TI 83 that you've been carrying around.

Ryan Lufkin:

Collector's item at this point, right?

Ben Berte:

I've still got my 82!

Ryan Lufkin:

I found an old uh , phonics VHS when we were cleaning our the laundry room the other day. I shared it to our Slack channel. It was like this used to be cutting-edge learning technology.

Matt Goodwin:

These item types are like in-tool now. Um, I don't think I could author or take one of those exams anymore at this point without a refresher, but it's super cool that it's there.

Ben Berte:

Yeah, we're excited about this, this school year especially, I think we're going to see a lot more mixed classroom experiences. Um, going into this school year, we're going to have a blend of online and face to face, and having the ability to provide assessments to students at home or who are remote with these complex item types—that would have required paper previously—allows us to reach students wherever they're taking the assessment and for a teacher to be able to create content that will display student understanding or hopefully allows students to display it, whether they're, they're right there in the front row or they're at home 10 miles away. So this is just great timing as well for all of these educators to get these extra tools and extra time to learn. Right?

Jenn Mitchell:

And I think that's a great segway into , um, what your team's doing around student experience and really improving that. I know the last few months have thrown us all kind of for a loop, but I think it really highlighted that we need to improve the way that we serve our students and our teachers. So let's, let's jump into some of the things that you guys are doing around student experience and improving that for this fall.

Ben Berte:

Thanks Jenn. So in addition to the content itself, we're really working on our student portal. Our student portal is the, is the online location where students can go and access these assessments as well as monitor their own understanding. What we want to do is we want to be able to have an easy place for them to click on a link and take the assessment , um, as well as how am I performing in a class on a standard by standard view? So I can have that ownership over my own understanding and my own learning. So can I clearly in a very easy way, look at the standards that I may be struggling with at the moment and then be able to prioritize my own time on working on those. So we've created a number of views that give the student portal and the student access to digestible data views that let them see where they are and how they can focus their own time, especially if they're doing more independent learning moving forward. We recognize a student's gonna potentially have to stay on top of their own interaction or their own understanding more because maybe they're not going to be physically as close to a teacher and get that two minutes after class. So can they internalize where they are and then hold online office hours for example, or set up that conference. So we've been spending a lot of time around that portal and the Canvas InstUI design philosophy has really helped us because all the elements within Canvas have the accessibility built in and the design already there for us to take advantage of. So we're using a lot of those elements that'll make this view very familiar for Canvas users as well. So as they transition into this portal, it'll be familiar and easier for them to access and understand without kind of that dissonance of, of learning new components. So we're excited about that as well—taking on that, that style of Canvas and bringing that into mastery connect to make that fluidity between products even more seamless. And we're , so that's a big, big focus on back to school as well. And so that'll make that student experience stronger. In addition to that , student experience crosses over with the parent portal so they share a view. So teachers have the ability to determine how much content they make available to the student and parents, the students can see how they're doing, but not necessarily dig into an assessment at a question by question level unless the teacher wants that. It's important that a teacher is determining what the students and parents see in case they want to reuse the assessment or discuss it on their own time. So really working on that online portal is a big piece of it. Hopefully we can then get to, you know, expanding out even more in the student and parent side as we go through the school year. We're really focused on August 1st getting a lot of these pieces ready to, ready to get in customer's hands.

Matt Goodwin:

Oh, that's awesome. I'm sure they'll appreciate it as they get back into it this fall too. Thanks for being on the show today, Ben, and filling us in on what your team's been up to and what we can look forward to come fall.

Ben Berte:

Thanks for having me guys.

Jenn Mitchell:

Yep. We'll definitely have you back. Thanks Ben.

Matt Goodwin:

Brighton. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for joining us.

Brighton Hertford:

Thanks. It's good to be back.

Ryan Lufkin:

Producer Brighton.

Brighton Hertford:

Back among friends.

Matt Goodwin:

So , uh , you're joining us today to talk more about a teacher appreciation month and educator of the year , um, and what Instructure is doing along those lines this season. Is that right ?

Brighton Hertford:

Yeah, absolutely. 'Tis the season. I think there's no time like now where , um , my friends and my family have, have gained a deeper appreciation for teachers because they're having to do it in their own homes.

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah, we were just talking about this before the show. Um, yeah, I've got my kids back at home trying to learn and I'm trying to pseudo teach them. I , I wouldn't even call it that. I'm like, filling in as a facilitator and pulling my hair out and praising, praising the names of the teachers at the school that do this every day.

Ryan Lufkin:

I try to help with math. They keep just telling me that's not how we do it.

Brighton Hertford:

Yeah. I had a , a great teacher , um , for a while. Her name was Ruth Anne Crudup. And I remembered saying the words to her—I hate math. And she said, then math is going to hate you back. So you gotta right your relationship with the numbers. So that was, that was a lesson I never forgot. Um, so I feel you there. Yeah. I myself used to be a teacher and I miss the classroom, but I'm so glad to continue to work for , um, education in a different capacity. I wanted to talk a little bit about , um, the educator of the year , um , nominations that we have going on. We'll select one winner from each category. So elementary school, middle school, high school, adjunct, an instructor , um, associate professor and professor. And those nominations are being accepted up through June 30th of this year, or until 500 nominations are received. So whichever one comes first. But , um, yeah, it's, it's pretty awesome. We'll be giving awards and recognition , um, at CanvasCon online 2020 in October. Um , they'll get a bunch of sweet Canvas swag, there'll be involved in the press release. Um, and it goes without saying, but obviously here at Canvas, we highly value our educators and so I would really encourage everybody to go and if they have direct interaction with teachers to , to nominate them.

Ryan Lufkin:

So we'll, we'll add the submission form in the show notes down below. But tell us a little bit about like what are we looking for in those nominations?

Brighton Hertford:

For sure. So each category is a little bit different , um, but basically how the educators are redefining traditional classrooms, no time like the present. Um, and how they're supporting inclusion and improving achievement for our at-risk populations. And then a big, a big chunk of that is , um, how this teacher inspires students and sparking curiosity and helping them grow and achieve. So I think pretty good criterion for an awesome teacher. Um , I think we can all reflect back on our own learning experiences. And, you know, like Ruth Ann, my teacher who taught me not to hate math, Um, we have some of those very inspiring , um, educators who stick out to us. So I think for , uh, for your students right now and if you yourself are taking classes online or, or anything like that, make sure you give your teachers the kudos they deserve.

Jenn Mitchell:

Mine was Patricia Russell in high school and you know, took somebody who was kind of angsty, too much black eyeliner wearing, you know, and at the time and really was able to funnel that into something that , that turned into a career in marketing, writing in a much different way than, you know, those angsty poetry in my diary. And so shout out to her if she's listening, but you know, I would love to go back in time and nominate her for something like this.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah, mine was my eighth grade , uh , writing and newspaper teacher, Prudence Hawthorne , which is the best name ever, Prudence—if you're out there , uh , shout out. But yeah, she actually, that was the first time I realized I loved writing and it's because she made it so creative and fun and you know, just did everything kind of in a novel different way. We have so many teachers doing things in novel different ways right now. I think we're going to get a lot of stories.

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah. It's fun. Um, those moments that you remember are when you were kind of encouraged to engage in , like just mentally be present and engage and challenge yourself. And , um, I'm super curious. You know, what educators are doing right now when you're not in the classroom. We've got this kind of weird thing unfolding in front of us where distance is, is where everybody's learning from and, you know , how are we engaging with our students today?

Brighton Hertford:

Yeah, I've seen some really awesome things. Um, I myself don't have kids, but I am the world's best aunt. I mean I don't think that award can go to anyone else . But um, yeah. Um, even my niece and my nephew, their teachers did , um, they're doing so much to support online learning and then they're going above and beyond. Um, they put flags at my sister's house in their lawn, and they did a teacher parade during a teacher appreciation so they could go and see all their kids and wave at them from a distance. I think it's an incredible time. You know, I think we're all facing unique challenges that we haven't before. And it's really cool to see the human spirit thrive, to really see people kind of , um , take the bull by the horns and turn this into a positive thing. Um, connect with their students in , in ways that they haven't before. So it's pretty remarkable, remarkable time—silver linings on this really strange situation,

Ryan Lufkin:

Which should be hard to judge. We should have a solid field of candidates, so nominate teachers that, you know, are doing awesome stuff.

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah. Uh , definitely get out there and do that. Remind us again the timeframe that we're looking at Brighton?

Brighton Hertford:

Yeah. We're expecting submissions all the way up through , um, June 30th, so the end of June.

Matt Goodwin:

And announced in July?

Brighton Hertford:

Yeah. So we'll notify the winners July 31st, 2020 and then they'll get the warm glow of victory and confirmation of their awesomeness has a, as we so aptly put on, on the submission form , um, and then that Canvas swag and press release and additional media coverage and an award and recognition for their hard work. And I mean, we should celebrate these teachers more than just a month, but it's good to have a concerted effort right now.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah , and just a reminder, I think we mentioned it before, we will mention it again and again, but InstructureCon has now morphed into CanvasCon online 2020. It is free. Um , we've expanded the content for K12 as well as higher ed and the great product content everybody's got used to, plus we'll be doing some cool interactive stuff to keep people engaged. One-day event . Um , so make sure you fill in your calendars .

Brighton Hertford:

I'm really excited.

Matt Goodwin:

Thanks for coming on the show again. Brighton.

Brighton Hertford:

Yeah. Good seeing you and hearing ya .

Ryan Lufkin:

Thanks, Brighton.

Matt Goodwin:

Welcome to the show Jackie. Uh , today with us, we've got Jackie from our events , uh, group and she's going to talk to us a little bit about InstructureCon and some of the changes we can see this year.

Ryan Lufkin:

Welcome. Welcome to the TLDR podcast. First time. First time joiner.

Jackie Burrell:

Thanks for having me guys. I'm excited to be here.

Brighton Hertford:

So we know that there's some challenges this year around in person events. So can you talk to us a little bit about how InstructureCon will look different this year?

Jackie Burrell:

Yeah, absolutely. Um, yeah, a lot, lots of changes. Uh, not only with , um, our events, but globally, obviously, you know, we are going to take the event online. InstructureCon is , uh , just a fantastic event. You know, we're all about making real connections with people , um, and we still want to do that and we're going to do an awesome job at it virtually as well. So we're going to combine all of our in-person events this year and have a , uh , massive , um, global online party.

Ryan Lufkin:

That's awesome. I always, I always go InstructureCon kind of the, the Canvas Community IRL , right? Like, it's the one chance, you know , for everybody to get together in real life, but you guys have some pretty fun things planned around just kind of keeping that engagement going, right?

Jackie Burrell:

Yeah, absolutely. Um, you know, we still plan on some amazing keynotes both internally and , uh, bringing in some great inspirational folks , uh, to be announced soon.

Ryan Lufkin:

I'm excited about that.

Jackie Burrell:

Um , yeah . Yeah. Um, we're also going to bring everybody together and , um, you know, a virtual live chat room experience. We have amazing partners and you know, we have , um , an amazing community that still wants to talk and get together and share ideas. And we're going to do that. We can do some fun giveaways, you know, we're going to keep the InstructureCon spirit alive.

Jenn Mitchell:

So I know one of my favorite parts of InstructureCon is to hear from our customers, and I know that when we transitioned online it was really important to keep that customer voice. So we've been looking over the sessions and there's just been some really good ones. So talk to us a little bit about what it means for the different tracks of attendees. So we have our higher ed folks, our K- 12—we're still catering to those audiences.

Jackie Burrell:

Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. You know, we're going to kind of bring the best of the best here together and um, and still , uh, do those breakout tracks , um, and have those on demand for people to access sometime after the conference as well. And we're going to get, you know, a global flavor still.

Ryan Lufkin:

Well for , for next steps. I know we'd already started talking to customers about , uh , presenting and, and hosting their sessions. What are the next steps? What can they expect from us?

Jackie Burrell:

Um, you know, next steps we're going to be , uh, you know , uh , formalizing the agenda , um, announcing our keynotes and then reaching out to , um, to our presenters and , um, start , uh , building their , you know, what that online portion looks like for their sessions.

Ryan Lufkin:

That was a totally loaded question 'cause Jenn and I are going to be sending those emails.

Matt Goodwin:

What is the mix of sessions this year? I know, you know, one of the things that people really look forward to is , um, you know, not all the sessions are Instructure sessions. There's a ton of great sessions by, you know, their , their peers out there at different institutions and school districts. Um, do we expect to have a similar mix to what we would have in our live event?

Jackie Burrell:

Yeah, absolutely. And Jenn and Ryan, you could probably speak to that better than I can, but , um, we always strive for a great mix, both higher ed K-12 , um, and you know, a variety of topics that people want to hear about. But , um, Ryan, Jenn, you want to talk a little bit about how we're we're doing that?

Jenn Mitchell:

Yeah. So, so from the K-12 side, we really looked at, you know, selecting, selecting a variety from around the United States, but also around the world to show that global representation. And I think now that we have all, have , have had this same challenge, no matter where we live, I think it's great to learn from educators from all over the world on how they're addressing issues and how they're impacting student learning, whether that's specific to the situation we're in, but, but also other things that have been working for people for years around the country. We can, we can tune in on a global audience. And I think that's really exciting.

Ryan Lufkin:

That's what we're seeing a lot as we've, as we've been talking to customers. Um , there are a lot of lessons learned from across the globe that they're wanting to share. And so , um, as we reach out, you'll still have a, sessions for everybody. There'll be admin focused sessions, faculty focused sessions, higher ed K-12 . Um, we're , we're talking about RTO and FE and some of those kind of niche learning markets , uh , you know , globally that we'll be addressing some content with. Of course, we have our internal team talking, you know, Matt's gonna , I've already got Matt signed up for a session, so he like, or not he's presenting. Uh , and so I think, I think we're gonna have a really nice mix of like , people are going to be excited. Plus, you know, the cool stuff to create interactivity. And, you know, I'm excited. It's, it should be pretty awesome. Not, you know, maybe not the same as standing in the, in one spot having a beer or soda. Uh , but you know, it should be pretty fun.

Matt Goodwin:

How does this change things for your team, Jackie? I know you guys are like running around with your hair on fire. For weeks on end.

Ryan Lufkin:

I don't know what you're talking about.

Jackie Burrell:

Um, we're still doing that, just , uh, combined with other things at home just like everybody else. No. Um, you know, it's, it's, it's a great experience for us. I think, you know, the world is adapting , um, to new things and so are we, and I think we have a , an amazing community that's going to , um, showcase, you know, all their amazing things virtually as well. Um, you know, so for us, we're, we're just kind of changing how we, you know, reach out to people and what we're doing and really trying to keep that engagement , um, factor there for our folks.

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah. I think that's awesome. I , you know, I'm already seeing , um, really the, the session blocks shape up really well. I'm excited about that. I think something that's going to change dramatically for all of the Instructure folks , um, at least from like product and marketing and, and those that are used to being on the floor and talking to all the customers for three days straight—you know, starting at 7:00 AM until one in the morning, three days in a row. It's exhausting. But , uh, so many great connections come from that. It'll be interesting to see how we can try to capture some of that and create some of that interaction , um , in a virtual space this year. I'm excited to see how that unfolds.

Jackie Burrell:

Yeah, and I think the other thing too, you know, Matt, is that, you know, being a, an in-person event—you know, people are limited in what they can do and travel and, and, and to get to us, it's, you know, financially , um, uh, you know, a great expense to some . But this being online and it being free—case I didn't mention that—it's a free event for all to come. Uh, we're seeing some great traction and I think we're going to get a bigger global community together than we ever have been able to before. And we're starting to see that and we're really excited about that.

Jenn Mitchell:

And I'm excited on the K12 front; we know how hard it can be for teachers to travel. So this is a great opportunity for some people that may have never experienced a, IstructureCon , to join that community and be part of it.

Ryan Lufkin:

So Jackie, you mentioned that , uh , we've already got some great momentum. I've seen the numbers, they look awesome, but what can folks that want to, want to attend do, where do they go?

Jackie Burrell:

Um, so , uh, we have an amazing website, CanvasCon.com and uh , just go there and register for free, like I said, and , and we'll send you all the information.

Jenn Mitchell:

So speaking of those details, I don't know if we mentioned, do you want to go into the date and times and kind of how that will work globally?

Jackie Burrell:

So , um, now that we are going virtual and we are um, working with a larger global community, we are pushing the date back to October 15th and we are going to be working in three different major time zones. Not to say that anybody outside of that can't join, just working off of those start times. So we'll be starting at 10:00 AM in Sydney and then we'll move to 10:00 AM in um , EMEA (London). And then we will launch at 10:00 AM here in North America , uh, Mountain Standard Time. And you'll also be able to find all of that information on our website. Um , and if you have any questions, there's a whole FAQ section. Um, and you can also always email our team [email protected] . com.

Ryan Lufkin:

And so much more to come with the announcement of the keynote. So I'm excited about that.

Jackie Burrell:

Absolutely. Details will follow and we'll be , um, we'll be sending those out , uh , soon.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Thanks Jackie. Maybe we'll have you back before, you know , uh , an episode or two before InstructureCon happens so that we can kind of unveil some of the details that aren't available yet. Right. So , um , more specifics on how people can join in with community, specific items that are yet to be defined and , and things like that, but, super informational and informative. Thank you.

Jackie Burrell:

Love hanging out with you guys. Any time.

Ryan Lufkin:

Well, that's it for this month's Canvas TLDR podcast. Hopefully you learned a little bit. It's an exciting time in education.

Jenn Mitchell:

Stay safe and healthy everyone, and we will see you next month.

Brighton Hertford:

Thank you for joining us on the Canvas TLDR podcast. If you'd like to take a look at what's happening in our next release, please visit releases.instructure.com and we'll see you next month. Bye bye.

Introduction
MasteryConnect and Item Authoring—Ben Berte
Teacher Appreciation Month & Educator of the Year Award Submissions—Brighton Hertford
InstructureCon Updates—Jackie Burrell
Wrapup