the tl;dr by canvas lms

Every Day I'm Shufflin'

February 19, 2020 Canvas Product Team Episode 2
the tl;dr by canvas lms
Every Day I'm Shufflin'
Chapters
0:19
Events
4:58
Quizzes—Kevin Dougherty
16:43
Commons Favorites—Zsofi Goreczky
21:21
Portfolium—Peter D'Orsi
the tl;dr by canvas lms
Every Day I'm Shufflin'
Feb 19, 2020 Episode 2
Canvas Product Team
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers
Ryan Lufkin:

Welcome to the canvas TLDR podcast. I'm Matt Goodwin with product, and I'm Ryan Lufkin with marketing, and we're here to talk about why we build what we build, because pandas can't.

Matt Goodwin:

And so what events do we have coming up?

Ryan Lufkin:

Well, obviously we like to talk about InstructureCon a little bit, and if you're listening to this before February 22nd, the call for proposals is still open. Um, so you should go to instructure.com/canvas and click on the news button or just search for InstructureCon 2020.

Matt Goodwin:

So I'm going to ask you a question about call for proposals. Um , who should be submitting a proposal and what type of proposal should they be submitting?

Ryan Lufkin:

Oh, geez. There's, you know, there's been 120 sessions. Um, I get the, the , uh, lucky , uh, I can't think of why my words won't come out of my mouth. I have the responsibility of planning all those 120 sessions. And so , um, you know, everything from very technical sessions, how you're using , um, plugins, LTI integrations , um , how you're using data in great ways, how you're teaching classes in great ways. And leveraging the tools , um , the great things you've done on your own , uh, using canvas and , um , our different products to , uh , customize learning, experience, everything. So, you know, what we got last year is, you know, people really want to leave InstructureCon knowing how to use canvas deeper and better. And so, you know, we'll have a hundred sessions that are focused on specifically that. Um, and so

Matt Goodwin:

So, if I were to summarize , um, could I, is it fair to say if you think you're doing something cool that's helping your students be more successful or helping your faculty be more successful , uh , submit that as a proposal and say, this is what we're doing, that's helping people.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yep . That's the backbone of our conference. And so if you'd like to share, that's it so it maintains the focus. So, yeah, do that. If you don't know about InstructureCon, it's actually in Nashville this year. July 28th through the 30th of the Gaylord Opryland division center. If you've not been to that hotel, it's insanely large and impressive. Um, you know, how some of the same , um, high level presentations like Jared Stein and Mitch Benson and Melissa Loble and folks you love, plus some exciting keynotes that we're still working on that we can't talk about yet. Um, but that'd be pretty awesome. So , uh, even if you're not presenting, we encourage you to come and check it out. It's our community community manifest one time a year , um, in, in physical locations . So this year it's an Nasheville. And then the other piece too is , uh, I think the call for proposals for EDUCAUSE, even though it was all the way out in October is closed. Um , they may have a late entry point there, but we always love to get a lot of our customers talking at InstructureCon and sharing some of those same stories there . So check out their website as well. Um , for our California friends, we realize that Nashville can be a problem. And so , um, we'll be doing an event in California as well and we'll share more information about that. Um, but yeah, that's kind of what we've got going on. And if I'm right , she already had some people reach out directly to me who I met last year. Um, I don't think they're gonna let me , uh , MC again, who knows. We'll see. But yeah, for the people I met last year, there's sessions you've got that you want some specific , you know, I would like to hear.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Well , um, you know, our events really are about connecting with the users and uh, hearing, you know, connecting users with users , uh , kind of bolstering that community. But also it's a great opportunity for us to exchange ideas with the folks that are actually using the software. So , um, participate where you can.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yup. And actually, Matt, you'll be presenting there. I never know you have a session scheduled for you and things like that. So are we talking deeply about the products and we always love the feedback. It's a great opportunity to interact with our teams and provide that feedback.

Matt Goodwin:

Good to know. This, by the way, is the first I'm hearing of this, me being scheduled to be there, but I kind of expect it, so that'll be fun.

Ryan Lufkin:

I mean, you know , I'm going to bug you for that day . So I wouldn't be remissed to you if I didn't mention that we are having CanvasCon Sydney , uh, and information legally out of that that we have in CanvasCon in EMEA and that location get to be announced. Exciting though. So wait for that. But these really are like global , uh, events that bring just, you know, literally the smartest group of people in the world that I know , uh , together to share information on teaching and learning and using technology to help it out.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Thanks.

Ryan Lufkin:

Cool.

Matt Goodwin:

Okay. All right. So first up with us, we've got Kevin Dougherty who's one of our product managers over new quizzes and, he's going to tell us about all the new hotness that's coming out in the month of February. Welcome.

Kevin Dougherty:

Hi Matt. Hi Ryan. Thanks for having me. It's good to be here. In the February release we're going to see a consolidation of new quizzes and classic quizzes onto the same quizzes course page that everyone is familiar with. So the big change there is you will no longer go to the assignments page to create a , an assessment with new quizzes. Otherwise things are pretty much the same. You're still going to see an entry on the assignments page for uh , a new quizzes assessment—that's very consistent with how canvas behaves with graded objects. But now you're also going to see a new quizzes assessment listed on that quizzes page alongside assessments created with classic quizzes.

Matt Goodwin:

So Kevin, you know, we're talking about a change to that quizzes page. Um, maybe tell us a little bit about some of the challenges that we're facing. You know, why did we feel like this was, this was a necessary change?

Kevin Dougherty:

That's a great question. Um, being on the assignments page was a plan and it's a plan that's served its purpose. well, I think. Initially new quizzes when we decided to make it available to users through the beta and early feedback points , uh , in the process, we got a lot of information and feedback that said, look, please don't put this on the quizzes page. While this is not quite where we need it organizationally and we want our instructors to learn about it and explore it as a tool, we don't want it confused with our supported workflows and toolset. Very reasonable request, made a lot of sense to us too, so the button was put onto the assignments page to kind of create this friction point so that we didn't disrupt organizational workflows of various schools. Now that's, that's coming to an end. Um, that period has shifted new quizzes in a much stronger position and better place with its ability to support the broad canvas user base from a scale perspective, and it's time to begin the next phase of introducing our users to the new quizzes tool that we've been working on for them. And , and we think kind of incorporating that into the quizzes page is just going to make that a lot more intuitive for this next phase of exploration.

Matt Goodwin:

So, you know, with that process, you know , I like that you're talking about the process and the feedback that we're gathering along the way. Um, I, I know that we've gone through a couple of iterations on this workflow, right? Of saying the, let's put the new quizzes button on the quizzes page itself, but also just, you know, having it be new quizzes button. I think we , um, tested out an old quizzes button. Um, why don't you talk to us a little bit about the feedback that we got on that?

Kevin Dougherty:

Yeah, definitely. So , um, we did float to beta a very different solution than what we have ultimately landed on. And in a nutshell, that solution was to change , uh , some of the button wording everyone was familiar with from the quizzes page to , uh, use some terminology like old quiz, right? And , um, that was an exploration of what is the sentiment around this, if it were to really hit. And I understand that at first it might be like, oh my goodness, why did you even try that? Um, and I would just look at you and say, that's really what beta is for. Uh, and there are some things we can get feedback on, and we get tons of amazing feedback. I mean, our users are fantastic in that regard. And there is, however, a sort of depth and internalization of things when they actually hit. And we wanted to see where people were at on it. And not too surprisingly, we got feedback around the obvious, which is, hey, this is, this is not great wording, this is, this is not terribly informative. It kind of breaks some expectations, you know? And, and that helped us fasttrack some of the feedback and really get to kind of a re-understanding and a renewal. Hmm . How would, how would I want to say that ?

Ryan Lufkin:

That we're going to pull it off the Island. The people? Yeah.

Kevin Dougherty:

Yeah. Well that, that, that wording was definitely voted off the Island, but what was really such a benefit to us on the product team here were the things that were not so obvious and that change , uh , that experiment was definitely fruitful for us in kind of starting and triggering some conversations that surface the anxieties that still exist for some folks as they look forward to the transition to new quizzes. So, yeah, it was definitely something. I think that our users are not accustomed to, getting something that is , uh , maybe so quickly yanked. Um, but I, I really feel that the process worked very well. We had some really great conversations and were able to identify some schools that are very passionate about this type of thing and they gave us some great feedback. So for me, that was time well spent.

Ryan Lufkin:

Well, instant gratification, that's, you know, yeah.

Matt Goodwin:

Well it really speaks to, you know, just agile methodology in terms of how you develop software. Um, the fact that we can pull that and make a change so quickly is, is great. You know, fail fast. And that's one of the , um, the key principles of agile software development. Um, I love that, that you guys learned from that. You listen to the feedback and we're now in a much better place.

Ryan Lufkin:

Well, thanks everybody out there for giving us great feedback.

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah. Um, so, you know, that's what's coming up , uh, in February for our users. But , uh, you know, you haven't had a chance to , uh, in this format. Talk about some of the things that you've done in recent past. Uh, let's take just a couple of minutes and talk about, you know, just over the last couple of months. What are some of the other advances that we've made in the new quizzes arena?

Kevin Dougherty:

Yeah, thanks for the opportunity. A couple of months ago we released a manual submission for quizzes—for new quizzes, excuse me. So a teacher can go in and manually submit a student attempt. And the biggest thing we were hearing from teachers was, what am I to do when I have 15 students who for some reason didn't click submit before they closed their browser—what have you—I need to get grading done. I don't have time to go in one by one. And it made perfect sense to us. We were able to look to the classic quizzes feature , um , that performs a very similar function and draw from our feedback that we've gotten since then and from the success of that and provided a tool , uh , and functionality for that to be done for as many students as there in the class that haven't yet submitted all at once. Or any subject options.

Matt Goodwin:

Cool. I've heard that a lot over the past, you know , year and a half or so , um, of how badly people want that feature. And now that it's in, we've also gotten some great feedback of yes, this is actually meeting the expectation and the, you know, the desired result that we wanted to, to have with that feature.

Kevin Dougherty:

Yeah, we've been, we've been pleased with it so far. Um, and then we followed up with quiz level answer shuffling, or assessment level answer, shuffling essentially a lot of questions throughout your assessment or question types, present choices and options to the students. Um , and they don't need to be in a particular order. So we're not really talking about like an academic quality level thing. But now we're talking about cheating and how similar our exams are between students and things like that, and the ability to set, answer shuffling at the assessment level and have it cascade to all applicable question types. [It] goes a long way I think to saving time for instructors and we're still gathering feedback as to how helpful that turns out to be. We definitely use the success of the same feature in classic quizzes as an inspiration there for the behavior and the scope of this functionality. So , uh, hopefully we can hear back from some of your listeners in the coming months as to whether or not it landed.

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah, that's awesome.

Ryan Lufkin:

"Every day I'm shufflin'." I'm ready to to drop in a sound clip right there. It's one of my favorite songs.

Matt Goodwin:

That says a lot.

Ryan Lufkin:

We've actually heard requests for that one quite a bit and it seems awesome.

Matt Goodwin:

Okay, well maybe our listeners will enjoy that sound clip. We'll see . So along the same lines of, you know, talking about some of the features that existed in classic quizzes that we hear a lot about , uh, partial credit for multiple choice is something that we hear a lot about as well. I know you recently did some work there.

Kevin Dougherty:

Yeah. Yes we did. So , um, we have another phase of development coming to kind of polish it off, but in classic quizzes you have for the multiple answer question type this partial-credit scoring approach. And in new quizzes it started out with a sort of exact match, so very different paradigm. And we are in the process of adding , uh, the classic quizzes paradigm to new quizzes as well. So that question type going forward in new quizzes will have more than one scoring algorithm presented as an option to instructors.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Great.

Kevin Dougherty:

We're really hoping it's going to set a pattern. So another call for feedback to your listeners, please. Uh, you know, we want to think about what's the next question type to do this to. And unfortunately we can't do it to all of them all at once. So your feedback really goes a long way to helping us decide where it's going to be most useful in the near term. So , uh , can't wait for that to land. And for that to inspire some, "why isn't it here?" "Why can't it do this?" Because that's gonna tell us how it's going to get better.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome.

Ryan Lufkin:

Kevin. I have to say, you podcast like a pro. I feel like you're going to steal my job here.

Kevin Dougherty:

I couldn't imagine that that's even close to possible.

Ryan Lufkin:

You have a great voice for radio that's impressive.

Kevin Dougherty:

Oh, well thank you very much Ryan. I am having a great time doing this and you know, I'm really imagining like, I don't know, there's—I enjoy customer conversations. This isn't quite as fun. Uh , I'll be because we don't get the back and forth, but this is so much more rich than a blog. And um, you know, you guys have really good questions that I think a lot of users do, and so this is, this is a lot of fun.

Matt Goodwin:

It's been a pleasure having you on. I'm , I'm , uh , looking forward to having you back.

Kevin Dougherty:

I look forward to it. Thank you. All the best, take care.

Matt Goodwin:

So , yeah , Zsofi. Welcome to the show.

Zsofi Goreczky:

Hey Matt. Good morning.

Matt Goodwin:

Hi. Zsofi is one of our product managers and she is over the Commons area of canvas. So you know, all the, all the things that have to do with sharing content and resources amongst peers and in the community. Um , that's Zsofi and her team. And today she's going to talk a little bit about um, what's coming out to production in February, which , uh, correct me if I'm wrong, Zsofi, we're talking about favorites import to this month, right?

Zsofi Goreczky:

Exactly. That's correct.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Why don't you tell us a little bit about the problem that we were trying to solve with favorites import .

Zsofi Goreczky:

Yeah, sure. So if you're familiar with Commons, there's a bunch of great resources out there in commons and you can just go there and search and find some really nice resources that you might want to use in the future for your content that you create in canvas. However, when you search and you like something, you don't necessarily know yet, like which course you would like to put it into later, or maybe this course doesn't even exist in canvas yet, so you can favorite it and you can decide to import it later. So then you are in Canvas and you create your course content, and then you might remember that , hey, previously I found the good resource in Commons and they would like to put it into my course and it would fit there perfectly. However, in order to do this previously you had to close canvas or you had to open Commons separately, go there, and find that resource that you previously favorited or you put it there for future purposes and then you had to go back to canvas and continue editing your content. So from now, you are in canvas, you are creating course content, and you can get access to all your favorite resources in Commons without leaving canvas.

Matt Goodwin:

So favoriting inside of canvas is relatively new as well. Right? So just the ability to , to mark a resource as something that um , you want to kind of bookmark and get back to you really easily. But , but we're specifically talking about the import process on the canvas side—just making that a little more streamlined. Is that what we're seeing this month?

Zsofi Goreczky:

Exactly. And previously, it was available only in the rich content editor. And you could import only embeddable Commons favorite resources, but from now this function that is available on five other index pages as well for canvas learning objects like quizzes, discussions, modules, pages, or assignments .

Ryan Lufkin:

So if I'm an instructor, do I have to do anything to turn that on or is it just available?

Zsofi Goreczky:

Yeah, it's going to be available from the 15th of February on production and it's going to be available for everybody. Awesome.

Matt Goodwin:

Fantastic. Um, yeah, I know that commons , um, is , uh , heavily used by some institutions as way to quickly share content between , um, individuals within that institution or maybe within , uh , you know, a peer group or something. Um, the ability to favorite and the ability to easily import those I know has been highly requested, just, you know, so you don't have to go through all of those steps to get that content back in your, in your course. So that's pretty awesome.

Ryan Lufkin:

I think last time I looked at stats were like 120,000 shared learning objects in Commons.

Zsofi Goreczky:

Yeah.

Ryan Lufkin:

That's not a small amount to go through. So it's nice to be able to like find what you want and save them.

Zsofi Goreczky:

That's correct. And like I mean in Commons you can share with like different groups or even just uh , you guys share resource even just with yourself. Maybe you just want to see like what it would like in Commons, or maybe you just want to make sure that later you can also like put it back to canvas, but you can also share it with everybody. So we have like, as you mentioned it, Ryan, we have so many publicly available resources. You can just go there, search, and find something nice that you could also import to canvas and use it when preparing your course content.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Thanks. Zsofi.

Zsofi Goreczky:

Yes, anytime.

Matt Goodwin:

In our next segment we're going to be talking a little bit about kind of big picture stuff. So a lot of times, you know , um, we have products, we have features, and sometimes we just assume that our users know what those are. But I think sometimes it's worth pausing and explaining a little bit more in depth what those features are, those products are, and uh, you know, really filling in, in kind of that deficit of information that sometimes we just assume our users have.

Ryan Lufkin:

It's kind of why we're here, right? That's the whole point of the TLDR podcast,

Matt Goodwin:

Right? Why do we build what we build? Um, uh, to help us do that, we've invited Peter D'Orsi who runs product for Portfolium.

Ryan Lufkin:

Hello, Peter.

Peter D'Orsi:

Hi. Thanks for having me.

Ryan Lufkin:

Um , Portfolium is new to the Instructure family but has been around for a few years doing some super cool stuff. So Peter why don't you tell us a little bit about what Portfolium is, how does it help our users, and why does it make sense to be part of the instructor family?

Peter D'Orsi:

Sure. Uh, Portfolium was created with the idea around connecting, learning to opportunity. Uh , so what that means really is giving students a voice to take all these kinds of skills, all this knowledge, all these artifacts that they're using in their day to day life in education. Uh, and presenting that in a , in a format that makes it clear to hiring managers and things about really I am a person that's graduated, here are my skills, and here's why I'm a good fit for entering into the workforce rather than coming with a blank slate I don't have kind of work experience. I am new to all of these experiences. I do have this curated portfolio of all of these things that I've collected. Here it is.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah. I like the analogy. I think Trey used at one point—Trey Marcowitz—that it's kind of like LinkedIn but with like proof that you have the skills that you claim to have, right?

Peter D'Orsi:

Absolutely. Yeah. It's, you can really start to dive into, here is the actual assignment I turned in, here are my reflections and here are the skills I learned along the way. And then how does this fit into a larger narrative around, this is one piece of this pathway that I'm trying to show for mechanical engineering or whatever course and, you know, career path you're looking for.

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah. Um , so I think this is a great example of, you know, canvas as a platform. Um, we will never solve every problem that exists in the educational space just because there's too many problems. Um, and we can only focus in on so many things that we think are core and that we need to , uh , be excellent at. And other things that—companies already exist , products already exist that do these things really well. Um, I think this is a good example of a need in the ePortfolio space that we saw and that we, you know—we here at Instructure have said, we want to be really, really good at this. Um, but hey, guess what, there's already partners out there that, that are really, really good at this. Let's talk about , uh , bringing them in to help solve some of this need. And I think , um, you know, that's a perfect example of how Portfolium fits really, really well. You guys have been doing cool stuff for how long now?

Peter D'Orsi:

Uh, just over five years.

Matt Goodwin:

Over five years. Uh, solely focused on solving these problems that, you know, we haven't had the affordance to do. So, you know, welcome to the family, by the way!

Peter D'Orsi:

Thank you . Yeah , it's really great to say like these things are happening in your courses and then having a way to translate that into being aware of these things that are happening and showing them it's really showcasing your stuff. Yeah.

Ryan Lufkin:

So Peter, we, you know, it's been a little while since we, I think we announced the acquisition at InstructureCon last year and we've got a little time. Tell us what , uh, what we've done so far.

Peter D'Orsi:

Sure. I would say the biggest thing that most people will notice is you can enable that connection between canvas into folios. Um, so you can, from your profile directly dive into your ePortfolio.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah.

Matt Goodwin:

So let's, let's like, I just want to push on that a little bit. So say I'm at , you know, I'm an instructor at X university, what does that mean for me? Like having that connection there or you know, I'm a student at X institution, like , uh , how do I, how do I use Portfolium , um, the folios in particular and um , like how is that different than, than what I was doing already inside of canvas.

Peter D'Orsi:

So by enabling , uh , the folios component , uh , you're really adding a new kind of link into the profile navigation that once you click on it will open a page that takes you through kind of a narrative of what you can do on Portfolium. The first thing you'll notice is it says import your artifacts from canvas. Uh, so just by clicking that first button, you're dumped right into a process where you can start to pick and choose things that you've turned into assignments and pulling them directly into creating a new eportfolio.

Matt Goodwin:

So this is my body of work that I've produced as a student that I want to showcase.

Peter D'Orsi:

Absolutely. Yep . And then from that point, we take you through a kind of process of, you know, tell us more. Is there a reflection you want to have on this assignment? Do you want to add maybe teammates or skills, or how do you want to enhance this to make it, you know, a really show-worthy piece on your portfolio.

Matt Goodwin:

Nice. So , um, yeah, what like what other things? So there's that connection piece, making that transition from how do I even start putting stuff in my, in my folio. Um , what other things have been working on since last summer?

Peter D'Orsi:

We've also , uh, added a lot of things , uh, to our , our pathways product, which allows students to kind of see the assignments and the progress against those assignments and how they tie to the larger picture. Uh, that is a great way to say these are the skills you learn along the way and why these assignments are kind of important. Uh , we've done a lot , uh , to help educators , uh, show mastery and outcomes to set their students up for success on the platform. And all these things tie into the output on the portfolio piece , uh , that the student takes advantage of.

Ryan Lufkin:

That's one of those pieces too, we've talked about with, with pathways. You guys also work with Badger, our badging partner, right? To issue badges around those pathways and um, kind of build , uh—pathways—to , uh, to an achievement, right?

Peter D'Orsi:

Yeah. And pathways is great because it, it's rewarding that as you kind of move through these milestones, you can not only see your progress and see that, you know, I can work towards this larger credential at the end of a badge, for example, but let me see all the steps that I'm going to need along the way. And maybe I'm earning smaller badges that are contributing , uh , to that larger badge. And as you're earning these things on pathways, they're directly deposited into your folio. Um, and then you can showcase them there.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah. People talk a lot about gamification and I guess this is a form of gamification, but I like that it's so tangible and measurable. It's cool.

Peter D'Orsi:

Yeah. And you can imagine that pathways can encompass obviously lots of co-curricular things. So you can kind of go on these little tiny micro milestones and earn different kind of badges along the way.

Ryan Lufkin:

That's cool.

Matt Goodwin:

So , um, one of the things that we try to do , uh , here on the show is , um , help people understand how we come to certain conclusions. Like why are we building this thing the way that we did? Uh, what have we learned along the way? What are some interesting things that you've learned in talking to some of the customers , um, or the users out there and , um, that have influenced, you know, hey, we should work on this next, or we need to change this interaction.

Peter D'Orsi:

So yeah, I would say the largest kind of customer conversations we've had a lot around that outcomes piece, which is when you talk about student success kind of as the larger picture, it's not just saying, you know, we're going to give a students this tool. They're going to themselves successful. It's around informing kind of the institutions of how they can start that process in the classroom. So we did a lot of kind of research and conversations around what types of mastery are important , uh, to prepare not just your assignments, but all these other kinds of things you might be doing on pathways and tying that into mastery of those skills so that you can kind of iteratively improve and change your curriculum or your pathways or however you're thinking about preparing students to enter the workforce and tying that all back to the larger picture.

Matt Goodwin:

So is that what you're hearing from , uh , faculty members, from administrators...like who's , uh, who's providing this feedback and you know, why do they care about it?

Peter D'Orsi:

I would say it starts at, at the program level where they're trying to show, you know , the link between the students being successful in the accreditation of the program itself and how all these kind of bits tie together to tell that larger story of, we are going to, you know, prepare for the , the correct things, but we also need to visualize what that looks like through something like a curriculum map or through some sort of mastery , uh, and how those skills will ultimately end up on the student's piece. And that is at the administrative level.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah. We , we actually talk to them . Um, a couple of weeks ago we talked to , um, uh, Ed and ,Linda Molina from Alamo colleges. Uh, actually the specifically , um, Palo Alto College, and I don't want to spoil a potential case study we're working on, but you know, they were, they were telling some great stories about how it's almost become viral with their students , um, to use this and across the different courses, uploading their assets, making sure they're kind of curating those portfolios to show just the cool things they've accomplished, right. The cool work they've done. Um, and it's kind of spreading across the organization. And , they talked about some unique ways that , um, students with challenges. It was actually enabling them to have a voice, share their information with peers , um , and really feel a sense of accomplishment that, that um, you know, they didn't have a channel for before. It's really cool. I , it's nice to hear those stories, you know, when we're all in a room, kind of tearing up, talking about the stories, you realize the power of, of something like these.

Peter D'Orsi:

Yeah. And that , that's kind of a great functionality of Portfolium itself is you're not just alone making an eportfolio on like, you know, your own personal site. You are connected to that larger network of the institution that you're attending. But you can also make connections along the way. You , you can reach out to maybe a place that has an internship you're interested in and they can see your profile and then make that connection along the way.

Matt Goodwin:

Oh, that's cool. Cool. Um , anything else we should know about in the near term? What's in the hopper?

Peter D'Orsi:

No, it's not, how should I say? We're , we're always looking at ways of, you know, improving that connection between obviously canvas and Portfolium, whether that's updating the LTI or adding kind of new functionality into pathways to say that maybe we, you know, need a different way to capture requirements. We get a lot of feedback around, you know, career readiness means that students are doing internships, they're going to career fairs, they're doing all of these things that can't be kind of captured in the classroom. How do we let them know that these opportunities exist when there's nothing to actually kind of assess? Um, so we're kind of looking at pathways now and coming up with ways to have these requirement types that don't require the student to actually submit something to be assessed, but have proof that they attended, for example, a conference. Yeah.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Yeah, I can see the power in that for sure.

Ryan Lufkin:

Well , so Matt, I know a week ago, a couple of weeks ago anyway , um, we, we've talked about some new features that were coming out internally and I know that we were making some fixes to the existing Canvas eportfolio solution, but , um , the goal really is to, to have , uh, everybody move over to portfolio at some point in the near future. Right?

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean , uh , like I mentioned before , uh, we do a lot of things okay. Um, but we can't go deep enough on all of those things. Um, our intent is to replace the ePortfolio tool that we've had inside of canvas with Portfolium and you know, all the awesomeness that is being worked on there and has already been delivered there. Um, so yeah, I would strongly encourage users to go check this out when they're able to and , uh, you know, realize the benefits that they get from using a more powerful tool than what we've been able to provide in the past. As far as timeline around that goes, you know, it's always expensive, not from necessarily a dollar perspective, but just , um, effort to have , uh , multiple versions of similar functionality exist. So we'd love to move people over as quickly as we as we can. Um, and that will be the , the goal and the intent. Uh, as long as, you know, it makes sense for our users. We're not gonna, we're not gonna push everybody off the cliff on this. We want to do it thoughtfully.

Ryan Lufkin:

Well, you'll definitely—yeah—I think Peter, you're probably going to be joining us for InstructureCon coming up here this summer , um , and have some sessions there. And so , uh, you know, if listeners want to actually join your session and hear more, you know, I'm sure you guys will be there in force , right?

Peter D'Orsi:

Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, we love talking about student success as a whole. We love talking about kind of how customers are using folios and kind of the future also around how do we just make this better. We want to be the best in the space. So that starts with the customer and starts with the user.

Ryan Lufkin:

Awesome.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Thanks Peter. Appreciate your time today.

Ryan Lufkin:

Thank you, Peter.

Peter D'Orsi:

Thanks for having me.

Matt Goodwin:

Awesome. Thanks for joining us. Uh, this month, February for our episode number two of the TLDR canvas podcast.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah , I found that very informative. I hope listeners did as well.

Matt Goodwin:

Yeah. Let know what you think. Give us feedback about the conversations we've had or anything else that you'd like to hear in the future.

Ryan Lufkin:

Yeah, and we'll keep adding, you know, as is, I don't think we've talked much about our friends from MasteryConnect yet. We need to pull those guys in. Um, I think we've got a lot to talk about, but , uh, definitely if folks have topics we want to hear about it . What do you wanna hear more about? Who do you want to hear from? All your favorite , uh , canvas personalities? We'll find them and drag them onto the radio.

Matt Goodwin:

All right . Thanks.

Ryan Lufkin:

Thanks everybody.

Events
Quizzes—Kevin Dougherty
Commons Favorites—Zsofi Goreczky
Portfolium—Peter D'Orsi